The Great Bike Powered Light Show Dance Party! rolls into Maker Faire this weekend!

The Great Bike Powered Light Show Dance Party is coming to Maker Faire this weekend at the New York Hall of Science in Flushing Queens!

More info including directions and tickets can be found here: MakerFaire.com

Come on out! I have a few half price passes to give away to the first people to respond. 

I will be dedicating these performances to my beloved father-in-law William Sievert who recently passed away.

Everyone Gets Electricity! 

 

Everyone Gets Electricity!

This is an idea I had for a talk about how the right bike can provide for consistent basic electrical needs to the billions on the planet without. Would that be a good thing? Please comment.

Call for Playlists

Call for Playlists for The Great Bike Powered Light Show Dance Party

Have a “Great Bike Powered Light Show Dance Party” to your 20-40 minute playlist at Figment New York! I’m looking for playlists that people can dance to. Any genre of music or noise that is more or less all ages appropriate and has some sort of rhythm will do.

There are a few different ways to do this:

1. put together your playlist on itunes and burn a cd (http://support.apple.com/kb/TA38263) then mail it to: David Aronson, 477 FDR Dr. #M1307 New York, NY or bring it with you to Figment. You can also bring your playlist on your phone or mp3 player and we’ll just plug it in. 

2. down load a trial of WireTap at http://www.ambrosiasw.com/utilities/wiretap/  then play your playlist from itunes while recording with wire tap. Upload the recorded file to my drop box at: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/zspakb1e9mbhxqd/hI1wIkRt2F

3. use a DJ program like Traktor, Abelton or my favorite DJay for Mac (available on the mac app store or at: http://www.algoriddim.com/djay-mac/download) to record your live DJ mix and upload an audio file to: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/zspakb1e9mbhxqd/hI1wIkRt2F

Remember 20-40 minutes! 

The Great Bike Powered Light Show Dance Party!

The Great Bike Powered Light Show Dance Party!  Steers new technology away from alienation and towards real world, carbon free participation!

Bikers crank power to a boombox and a projector. Music contributed by local musicians plays as digital imagery beams onto the very bodies of the dancer/participants. The visuals follow the shape and movement of the participants, paying attention to every gesture and transforming in reaction to movement and sound.

Goal of Project
Electronic imagery absorbs the focus of our daily lives in an increasing and encompassing manner. We work in front of computer screens, recreate before ever larger TVs, and socialize over smart phones. Before long, reality will be overlaid with Google Glasses, and we will dream of electronic sheep. The time has come for digital images to pay attention to us: to our bodies, our movement, our dance!

Conversely, technology has made our lives so easy that one of the largest health problems facing industrialized nations is obesity. We can order food on the Internet, Skype with friends and work remotely from our beds. It is time that we physically labor, that is we sweat, for our electricity!

First through the technique of dynamic projection mapping to use our bodies as media screens, and second by providing power for all this through bicycle generated electricity, The Great Bike Powered Light Show Dance Party!  addresses both of these concerns.

What will participants see?
The participants enter the space into darkness. There are two stationary bicycles in front. Two of the participants mount the bikes and start pedaling. Slightly visible towards the back is an eighties boombox. Also there are white balloons, streamers, and sheets for participants to wrap themselves in. Once everyone is inside, the artist announces the creator of the audio mix and starts the music.

The light show is driven by an algorithm which takes into account the movements of the audience and the sounds from the tape. Light projects onto the walls of the space and the very bodies of the audience. At first they find that they are only partially lit. Some are headless, others only heads. The walls look like that of a prison. Audiences are free to do nothing and remain repressed, or through dance become participants and carve out their liberation. If they move in rhythm with the music the walls open up and more of themselves appear. As participants move together the imagery projected onto them becomes connected. Depending on the music, they may find themselves covered in clouds, lit on fire, or covered in wires with glowing pulses flowing from person to person. The walls become places real and abstract such as forests, space, the sky, or swirls of colored light. The algorithm draws imagery for bodies and walls from a virtual library of images, video, and effects assembled by the artist.